Where we work

We love this place and we love our people. Africa is home and we know what needs to be done to see it thrive.

Through innovative solutions and on a scale of operational magnitude that rivals some of the largest distribution networks in the world, we work with communities to co-create the environment every African needs to thrive.

Where we work

We love this place and we love our people.
Africa is home and we know what needs to be done to see it thrive.

50,835 people assisted in 2021

549 people assisted in 2021

412,199 people assisted in 2021

01. Angola

Our operation in Angola was established in 1991 at the height of the civil war (1975–2002), initially delivering relief feeding.

We then built a food production facility in the province for a World Food Programme (WFP) school-feeding initiative. We went on to feed more than 220 000 primary school children daily, in partnership with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Currently, with the local governments, we provide school meals to children in the Benguela and Kwanza-Sul and Cunene provinces and deliver STEM training with the Lego Foundation. We work in malnutrition clinics across the country to address malnutrition among infants, children and pregnant or lactating women.

The worst drought in 40 years has prompted ForAfrika to respond to the emergency in the hardest-hit areas of Namibe, Huile and Kuando Kubango.

The worst drought in 40 years prompted ForAfrika set up an emergency response in 2021 to assist 5 000 children receive therapeutic feeding, whereas an additional donation from Life Outreach International allowed us to deliver food parcels to a whole community.

Assessments are carried out to determine appropriate potable water solutions whether that be drilling wells, rehabilitating existing wells or piping water from a nearby source. Training in hygienic practices is ongoing as an essential prevention method against malnutrition. Our agricultural practices are climate smart and are designed to conserve water.

We work in malnutrition clinics and outpatient centres across the country, delivering therapeutic milk and food and training medical staff, mothers and caregivers. Screening for malnutrition, malaria and other diseases is carried out on children, pregnant women and breastfeeding mothers and preventative treatments such as vitamins, deworming tablets or vaccinations are provided.

ForAfrika delivers school meals during term time to those on our programmes. When the Covid-19 pandemic struck, children were given take-home rations. We also run computer literacy programmes, thanks to a partnership with Boeing and teach Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) using the Lego Foundation’s Six Bricks initiative.

Where possible school and communal gardens are established to ensure families have a nutritious source of food and/or an income. In 2021 about 300kgs of large cabbages, green peppers and onions were harvested at school gardens. Training forms a core part of these programmes, allowing people to earn an income.

In Angola, our economic empowerment programmes have largely focused on agricultural training, farming inputs, such as seeds and implements, irrigation systems and market training.

Angola at a glance

People reached
985,626
Meals served
7,443,500
Clean water
954,062
Boreholes drilled
100

ForAfrika responding to climate change emergencies in Angola

The worst drought in 40 years has prompted ForAfrika to respond to the emergency in the hardest-hit areas of Namibe, Huile and Kuando Kubango.

02. Mozambique

ForAfrika’s operations started in Mozambique in 1984 during the civil war (1977-1992) where so many starved to death. Over time we began our school-feeding programme, with the assistance of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

We then built a food factory in Beira that manufactures the Corn Soya Blend (CSB) porridge mix used in our school-feeding programme. This factory has received ISO 22000 certification which means international recognition of operational excellence and food safety methods and, most importantly, that the children we serve are receiving the quality they deserve.

We currently focus on using produce grown in and around schools to supplement and diversify children’s diets.

Our team also responds to humanitarian emergencies as a result of the current ongoing conflict and natural disasters suffered by this country.

Mozambique is one of the countries running under constant emergency conditions, especially since violence flared up in the northern province of Cabo Delgado and it has been hit by consecutive cyclones since Idai in 2019. ForAfrika assists in life-saving water and food provision as well as non-food items.

ForAfrika’s WASH interventions in Mozambique include emergency water and sanitation provision, provision of latrines and bathing facilities, the drilling of boreholes, rehabilitation of wells and the erection of water stands and pumps as well as hygiene training. Our agricultural practices are climate smart and are designed to conserve water.

In Mozambique, where our farming interventions have been running for a long time, we concentrate on diversifying diets through supplementing children’s meals with fresh vegetables grown by emerging farmers. We also provide training on food safety, preparation and preservation to improve nutrition.

ForAfrika delivers school meals during term time to those on our programmes, benefiting thousands of children. School meals are also supplemented by fruit and vegetables grown in our farms and greenhouses. In our popular makeovers, volunteers spend a week painting and decorating the newly erected classrooms, kitchens, toilets and playgrounds. A nutritious meal at school encourages school attendance.

ForAfrika continues to train small-scale farmers, increasingly in climate smart methods, on demonstration plots. Farmers are also assisted by inputs such as seeds, tools and even livestock. Our farms and greenhouses supply schools and communities.

In Mozambique, our economic empowerment initiatives revolve around small-scale farmers and encouraging their growth and links to local markets and schools.

Mozambique at a glance

People rached
628,494
Meals served
903,330
Clean water
354,857
Nutrition gardens
25,449

ForAfrika and UNICEF in Mozambique

In Mozambique, ForAfrika conducted a rapid assessment to determine the most pressing needs of the people there and we intensified our engagement with the UN Cluster System, which led to a partnership with UNICEF.

03. Rwanda

ForAfrika established operations in Rwanda in 1994 immediately after the genocide, initially providing relief. In 1998, thanks to support from Life Outreach International, we established the Fred Nkunda Life Centre (FNLC) to care for children orphaned by the genocide. Since then the FNLC has integrated hundreds of orphans back into their families and communities and has transitioned into a vocational skills and training centre that provides men and women with instruction in welding, hairdressing, culinary arts, masonry and carpentry. Students are also taught French, English, mathematics, entrepreneurship and computer literacy.

In 2021, we appointed a new programme officer who has started assessing the needs for our programmes in the country. Rwanda will support the most vulnerable households in a holistic way through an integrated long-term approach.

Since the emergency and recovery period that followed the genocide in 1994, Rwanda has achieved substantial socio-economic progress and ForAfrika has fortunately not had to run any emergency responses in the country in quite some time.

Despite Rwanda’s relative stability and economic growth, there are pockets of poverty, especially in rural areas where the prevalence of diarrhoea and pneumonia is a clear indicator of poor hygiene practices and inaccessibility to clean water. ForAfrika has begun community assessments to establish programmes in Rwanda where there is a need.

Despite Rwanda’s relative success, 38% of children in rural households are stunted and child mortality rate remains high. Many households do not enjoy food security. ForAfrika has begun community assessments to establish programmes where there is a need.

There are many children who come from low-educated or illiterate households and who do not attend school. ForAfrika has begun community assessments to establish programmes where there is a need.

About 549 students at the Fred Nkunda Life Centre (FNLC) are taught various vocational skills allowing them to seek gainful employment once they have graduated. However, there are many who rely on low-income agriculture and poorly paid casual labour could benefit from skills transfer. ForAfrika is currently assessing the needs.

In Rwanda, our Economic Empowerment interventions are currently focused on education and vocational training.

Rwanda at a glance

People reached
3,000
Meals served
2,250
Vocational training
649
Agriculture
1000

ForAfrika overcomes restrictive measures in Rwanda

The restrictive measures in Rwanda did not allow for any school feeding to take place, but where possible we provided take-home food rations and fresh vegetable supplies to vulnerable families.

04. South Africa

Our operation in South Africa was established in 2004 to provide meals to South African school children. In 2008, when the South African government took over feeding at schools, we started providing meals to pre-school children instead.

This has since developed into a holistic Early Childhood Development (ECD) programme that includes school food gardens, WASH training, teacher training and infrastructure development.

Today JAM SA provides daily meals to about 120 000 pre-school children across the provinces of Gauteng, Eastern Cape, Western Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo, Mpumalanga, Northern Cape and Free State.

The meals are usually a bowl of ForAfrika’s own highly nutritious porridge (CSS+), a blend of Corn, Soya and Sugar and fortified with essential vitamins and minerals. A bowl of porridge contains a child’s required daily intake of these micronutrients.

We also respond to emergencies (such as the July 2021 riots) where desperate families were given food hampers using our innovative voucher system.

South Africa experienced the worst outbreak of violence in 2021 when two of its provinces experienced devastating riots that resulted in loss of property, food and employment. The country has also had its fair share of flooding and fires that have necessitated a response. During the Covid-19 lockdowns of 2020 ForAfrika initiated a food voucher and distribution system which has proven highly effective in states of emergency.

In South Africa, our WASH interventions centre mostly around training and the provision of handwashing stations in Early Childhood Development centres. We have also facilitated various school makeover projects, improving ablution blocks and installing rainwater harvesting tanks. Our agricultural practices are climate smart and are designed to conserve water.

In South Africa, regular Body Mass Index screening helps identify children who need nutritional interventions. We provide a highly nutritious CSS+ porridge, comprising Corn, Soya, Sugar and added vitamins and minerals essential to a child’s proper development. The porridge has been proven to improve children’s skin, energy and concentration levels at school or home-based care centres.

In South Africa we work in pre-schools, or Early Childhood Development (ECD) centres, serving our CSS+ porridge, encouraging good hygiene, investing in school gardens, teacher training and infrastructure development. In our popular makeovers, volunteers spend a week painting and decorating the newly erected classrooms, kitchens, toilets and playgrounds. A meal at school encourages school attendance.

Our interventions here largely centre around community gardens and agricultural training, but also assisting owners of ECD centres to register and grow successful businesses that can benefit those they employ.

By providing ECD centres with porridge, we allow owners to reinvest in their centres or earn additional income. Surplus vegetables grown in our supported gardens provide an income for many small-scale farmers.

South Africa at a glance

People reached
397,458
Meals served
2,615,314
Clean water
53,584
Voucher system meals
3,083,603

ForAfrika using technology to make a difference in South Africa

We launched an innovative mobile text message voucher system for food basket distribution. The system, which reduces food lines and allows for social distancing, is now being rolled out across five additional African countries and expanded beyond just food distribution to other sectors of ForAfrika activities, such as agricultural development.

05. South Sudan

Our operation in South Sudan was established in 2002, providing food and water for many who were desperate and displaced during the civil war (1983-2005).

Our interventions here have grown rapidly because of the dire needs of its people. In 2022, it was estimated that two-thirds of South Sudan’s population are in need of humanitarian assistance because of conflict, drought and flooding.

ForAfrika is now a primary distribution partner to the World Food Programme in this region. Current programme interventions include school feeding; school infrastructure improvements; therapeutic feeding and other medical treatments; food distribution and other food-related incentives; agricultural training; livestock vaccination and treatment; and WASH activities.

Our team constantly responds to humanitarian emergencies as a result of the ongoing conflict and natural disasters suffered by this country.

We also work with South Sudanese refugees in Uganda.

Like Mozambique, South Sudan is a country considered in constant state of emergency because of high levels of political instability, tribal conflict and natural disasters. ForAfrika has been responding to these related emergencies for about 20 years. Interventions include emergency water, food and shelter provision, among others.

Besides providing soap and hand washing stations, our WASH interventions centre around training in hygiene and teaching households about water purification using Aqua Tab and PUR. Training in hygienic practices is ongoing as an essential prevention method against malnutrition. Our agricultural practices are climate smart and are designed to conserve water.

We work in malnutrition clinics and outpatient centres delivering therapeutic milk and food and training medical staff, mothers and caregivers. We also support the elderly and disabled in these programmes. Screening for malnutrition, malaria and other diseases is carried out on children, pregnant women and breastfeeding mothers and preventative treatments such as vitamins, deworming tablets or vaccinations are provided.

In South Sudan we provide meals to about 45 000 children at schools on our programmes. Other activities have seen the construction of storage sheds and cooking facilities at school. Meals at school encourage attendance.

We provide agricultural training as well as inputs such as fishing kits, seeds and tools so that participants can immediately get to work on using their newly acquired skills. We focus on women and youth and seek out partnerships that will benefit their agri- or other businesses.

Cash for Assets programmes benefit individuals and the community. Individuals are paid to build roads, flood dykes or ponds that can be used by the community. Cash transfers are also used to assist people get back on their feet after displacement because of violence or natural disasters.

South Sudan at a glance

People reached
547,529
Meals served
253,524
Clean water
329,529
Malnutrition
10,011

ForAfrika, the World Food Programme and the United Nations in South Sudan

In South Sudan we teamed up with the World Food Programme and the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) to assist people with food.

06. Uganda

ForAfrika moved into Uganda in 2017 to work with South Sudanese refugees in camps in the North West region of the country in partnership with the Office of the Prime Minister (OPM).

In Imvepi, Lobule Rhino, Omugo, Palorinya and Moyo refugee camps, we
provide sanitation and hygiene packs as well as agricultural training and gardening start-up kits so that refugees can develop their own food gardens. Since refugees have had to live on mostly maize and soy rations provided by humanitarian groups, the fresh vegetables ensure diet diversification for families. Surplus vegetables are then either preserved for the lean months or sold as a source of income.

However, encouraged by the Ugandan refugee policies, our focus here is also on the integration of refugees into the host community and their peaceful co-existence. The two groups have been encouraged to farm together on communal land and the results have been overwhelmingly positive for all concerned.

Since our entry into the country, we have expanded to help refugees from other countries such as Democratic Republic of Congo. Assessments are ongoing for us to move into other areas where there is a need because of the dire effects of climate change.

In Uganda we assist refugees who are traumatised by having to flee their homes in South Sudan, Democratic Republic of Congo or elsewhere. Part of our work is in the reception centres at refugee camps where we assist with welcoming meals and hygiene products.

We provide hygiene kits and WASH training and have also implemented a number of foot-pedal irrigation mechanisms on our communal farming blocks. Our agricultural practices are climate smart and are designed to conserve water.

Our work in Uganda centres mainly around the production of nutritious fruit and vegetables — to improve food security; increase diversity in diet (since most humanitarian food rations are just corn or soya based); to improve mental health (gardening has proven to relieve trauma); and as a source of income.

Our education programme in Uganda is currently around agricultural and WASH training. We also focus on fostering peaceful co-existence between refugees and the host community through communal education programmes.

We provide agricultural training as well as inputs such as seeds, tools and irrigation pumps so that participants can immediately get to work on using their newly acquired skills. We also teach preservation and seed-harvesting methods in preparation for the dry season and future planting.

All of our programmes are geared towards allowing people to earn an income and we make sure to link emerging farmers with market opportunities. This will go a long way towards strengthening agriculture-based livelihoods and ultimately food security for both refugees and hosts.

Uganda at a glance

People reached
39,438
Vegetable distribution
9,365
Clean water
39,438
Agriculture
30,195

ForAfrika and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Uganda

In Uganda, our partnership with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) saw an expansion of our training and food security efforts.

TOP
JAM is ForAfrika
+