Your support unlocks Africa’s abundant resources for her most vulnerable people.

Where we work

We love this place and we love our people. Africa is home and we know what needs to be done to see it thrive.

Through innovative solutions and on a scale of operational magnitude that rivals some of the largest distribution networks in the world, we work with communities to co-create the environment every African needs to thrive.

01. Angola

Angola is one of Africa’s most resource-rich countries, yet two thirds of the population live on less than $2 a day and do not see the benefits. Additionally, the country has high infant mortality rates, poor access to clean water and sanitation , high illiteracy rates and is now facing its worst drought in 40 years.

The worst drought in 40 years has us assisting with therapeutic feeding and providing food
parcels to communities who are suffering at the hand of another missed harvest.

We provide safe, clean water to sustain life, be it drilling boreholes or rehabilitating existing
wells, and training in hygiene practices to prevent disease, malnutrition, and even death.
We also educate communities in climate-smart practices to conserve water.

In partnership with local malnutrition clinics and outpatient centres, we screen for malnutrition, provide therapeutic milk, therapeutic food, vitamins, deworming, and vaccinations as well as training for medical staff, mothers, and caregivers in essential health, care, and nutrition practices.

We partner with local schools to encourage and increase attendance by providing daily meals to scholars. Take-home rations are provided for the child and their family when schools close due to factors like Covid-19. We currently run computer literacy programmes and teach Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) using Lego’s Six Bricks initiative.

Together with our local communities, we grow school and communal gardens and provide training for their upkeep. This secures families with a source of nutritious food and an income from selling surplus produce. In 2021 about 300kgs of large cabbages, green peppers, and onions were harvested at school gardens alone.

Angola at a glance in 2021

People reached
985,626
Meals served
7,443,500
Clean water
954,062
Boreholes drilled
100

02. Mozambique

Although the country is endowed with ample arable land, water, energy, as well as mineral resources, Mozambique is still grappling with a military insurgency in parts of the gas-rich province of Cabo-Delgado. An estimated three million people are projected to face high levels of food insecurity across the country due to the combined effects of the conflict, climate shocks and economic instability.

A country consistently hit by natural disasters and ailing since conflict flared up in its northern province of Cabo Delgado, we are arm in arm with our communities here, assisting with life-saving water, food, shelter, latrines, bathing facilities, and other necessities.

We provide safe, clean water to sustain life, be it drilling boreholes or rehabilitating existing wells, and training in hygiene practices to prevent disease, malnutrition, and even death. We also educate communities in climate-smart practices to conserve water and the environment.

With community farming interventions that have been a long time running, we focus on diversifying diets and supplementing children’s meals with fresh vegetables grown by emerging farmers. We also provide training on food safety, preparation, and preservation to improve nutrition.

We partner with local schools to encourage and increase attendance by providing daily meals to scholars. These are supplemented with fruit and vegetables grown on our local farms and greenhouses. We also improve classroom and school infrastructure through ‘makeovers.’

Using demonstration plots, we train small-scale farmers in climate-smart methods and assist with inputs like seeds, tools, and even livestock. Our local farms and greenhouses supply schools and communities with nutritious vegetables.

We empower small-scale farmers by encouraging and facilitating their growth and linking them to local markets and schools.

Mozambique at a glance in 2021

People rached
628,494
Meals served
903,330
Clean water
354,857
Nutrition gardens
25,449

03. Rwanda

Rwanda's economy suffered heavily during the 1994 Genocide, with widespread loss of life, failure to maintain the infrastructure, looting, and neglect of important cash crops. This caused a large drop in GDP and destroyed the country's ability to attract private and external investment.

Since the emergency and recovery period that followed the genocide in 1994, Rwanda has achieved substantial socio-economic progress. Fortunately, we haven’t had to run any emergency responses in the country since.

Despite relative stability and economic growth, there are pockets of poverty, especially in rural areas where the prevalence of diarrhoea and pneumonia is a clear indicator of poor hygiene practices and inaccessibility to clean water. We are currently doing community assessments to establish how we can assist.

Through rural preschools, or Early Childhood Development (ECD) centres, we teach parents best practices in nutrition and health as well as how to grow nutritious vegetables to supplement their diets.

Many children come from low-educated or illiterate households and who do not attend school. We are currently doing community assessments to establish how we can assist.

We assist students at the Fred Nkunda Life Centre (FNLC) where they are taught vocational skills needed to seek employment once they have graduated. Using small pieces of land, we train our communities in innovative agricultural production to secure families with a source of nutritious food and an income from selling surplus produce.

We educate communities on Village Savings and Loan Groups; member-run micro-financing groups that enable savings and taking out of loans at low interest rates. We also facilitate them in finding groups to join that participate in viable economic activities.

Rwanda at a glance in 2021

People reached
3,000
Meals served
2,250
Vocational training
649
Agriculture
1000

04. South Africa

South Africa has made considerable strides to improve the wellbeing of its citizens since its transition to democracy in the mid-1990s, however over half its population lives in poverty, around 30% are unemployed and it has one of the highest, persistent inequality rates in the world.

Leaning on innovation to assist our communities through lockdown during the COVID-19 pandemic, we developed a digital voucher system as a means of safe and efficient distribution of food hampers. This innovation went on to serve our efforts to assist those affected by the massive losses caused by violent riots. Climate change has seen us responding to devastation by fires, and more recently floods.

Mostly focused on preschools, or Early Childhood Development (ECD) centres, where we improve their washrooms, train on hygiene, and install rainwater harvesting tanks for the efficient use of water.

We do regular malnutrition screening to identify children who need nutritional interventions and provide highly nutritious meals through preschools, or Early Childhood Development (ECD) centres, proven to improve children’s skin, energy, and concentration levels.

Working with our local pre-schools, or Early Childhood Development (ECD) centres, we encourage and increase attendance by providing a nutritious daily meal. We also aim to make the environment more conducive to safe learning and play through teacher training, hygiene training, and improvements to their infrastructure.

Establishing community gardens and providing agricultural training is one way that we help our communities to become more food secure as well as to benefit from the income of any additional produce that can be sold. By providing pre-schools, or Early Childhood Development (ECD) centres with food, their owners can reinvest in their centres or earn additional income.

We assist the owners of the preschools, or Early Childhood Development (ECD) centres we work with to run successful businesses so that they can derive enough income to even employ other locals. We also assist with linkages to market for the small-scale farmers we train so they can derive an income from any surplus they grow.

South Africa at a glance in 2021

People reached
397,458
Meals served
2,615,314
Clean water
53,584
Voucher system meals
3,083,603

05. South Sudan

Despite gaining independence in 2011, the country remains a humanitarian crisis reinforced by ongoing inter-communal conflict, displacement, and external shocks. In 2022, it was estimated that two-thirds of South Sudan’s population are in need of humanitarian assistance.

Extremely high levels of political instability, tribal conflict and natural disasters have us working with our communities to provide emergency water, food, shelter, and other essentials.

We provide safe, clean water to sustain life, be it drilling boreholes or rehabilitating existing wells, and training in hygiene practices to prevent disease, malnutrition, and even death. Using community led initiatives, we assist families to build toilets, provide soap and hand-washing stations. We educate families on water purification using Aqua Tab and PUR where possible and teach communities climate-smart practices to conserve water and the environment, like using solar irrigation in our community gardens.

In partnership with local malnutrition clinics and outpatient centres, we screen for malnutrition and malaria, provide therapeutic milk, therapeutic food, vitamins, deworming, and vaccinations as well as training for medical staff, mothers, and caregivers in essential health, hygiene, sanitation, and nutrition practices. In some areas, we engage women in a local community farming project to improve their access to nutrition.

We partner with local schools to encourage and increase attendance by providing daily meals to its scholars. To make the food more accessible we construct storage sheds and cooking facilities at the schools too. By growing school gardens, we educate children in agriculture and nutrition and use the school environment as a passage to provide them with deworming tablets and vitamin supplements.

By training our communities in agriculture and providing inputs like seeds and tools and even fishing kits, we know that people can immediately get to work and secure their families with a source of nutritious food and an income from selling surplus produce. We engage individuals in projects that will benefit them and their communities such as building flood dykes and roads, in exchange for cash. These activities often help those who have been displacement because of violence or natural disasters to get back on their feet.

We facilitate linkages to markets for those who take part in our community gardening projects so that they benefit from the income of the surplus that they don’t eat. We focus on often marginalised groups like women and youth and seek out partnerships that will benefit their businesses.

South Sudan at a glance in 2021

People reached
547,529
Meals served
253,524
Clean water
329,529
Malnutrition
10,011

06. Uganda

What is often referred to as a Refugee Crisis, the influx of refugees to Uganda has been mostly due to conflicts in surrounding countries. It’s central location and Ugandan generosity acts as a gateway to those often escaping the horrors of the life they have left behind in search of a new and dignified beginning.

Working with refugees, often traumatised by having to flee their homes in South Sudan, Democratic Republic of Congo, and surrounds, we assist with meals and hygiene products for those arriving at refugee camps.

We provide refugees and host communities with safe, clean water to sustain life, be it drilling boreholes or rehabilitating existing wells, hygiene kits and training in hygiene practices to prevent disease, malnutrition, and even death. We also ensure climate-smart solutions to conserve water and the environment in community agriculture practices like the use of foot pedal irrigation on our communal farming blocks.

Engaging refugees and host communities to produce nutritious fruit and vegetables provide nutritious diversity in their diets (most humanitarian food rations are corn and dry beans). Gardening has proven to relieve trauma so the benefits of this stretch beyond nutrition to improving mental health too.

In addition to training refugees and host communities in agriculture and hygiene, we focus strongly on fostering peaceful co-existence between refugees and the host community through communal education programmes. By growing school gardens, we educate children in agriculture and nutrition.

We provide agricultural training including preservation and seed harvesting to prepare for the dry season and future planting, as well as inputs like seeds, tools, and irrigation pumps to refugees and host communities so that people can immediately get to work and benefit from their skills with a source of nutritious food and an income from selling surplus produce.

We educate refugees and host communities on village savings and loan groups; member-run micro-financing groups that enable savings and taking out of loans at low interest rates. We also facilitate them in finding groups to join that participate in viable economic activities. Some have gone on to become grain traders, livestock farmers and market businesspeople.

Uganda at a glance in 2021

People reached
39,438
Vegetable distribution
9,365
Clean water
39,438
Agriculture
30,195
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